Breaker is a Finalist for the 2017 Thriller Award!

Wow, I just heard that I’m a finalist for the 2017 Thriller Awards. Breaker is up for Best E-Book Original Novel. Totally unexpected. Any time I can share an announcement like this with Megan Abbott, Jonathan Maberry, Laura Benedict, and Joyce Carol Oates it’s an honor. Wish me luck!

Monthly short fiction roundup – March, 2017

The latest short fiction roundup by Maria Haskins.

Maria Haskins

As usual, I feel like I didn’t read enough this past month. Just like my TBR-pile of novels and anthologies and collections is ever-growing, so is the list of short fiction I should be reading. Still, I did read a lot, and here are 15 fabulous stories from around the web.

The Worldless, by Indrapramit Das in Lightspeed. “Sometimes the starship looked like a great temple reaching to the sky. All of NuTay’s customers endless pilgrims lining up to enter its hallowed halls and carry them through the cloth that Gods made.” Every now and then you read a science fiction story that makes you remember exactly why you fell in love with the genre in the first place. This is one of those stories. It’s a story that deals with the small universe of relationships and love, while also creating a dizzying and believable, vast future-verse where…

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CHIRAL MAD 4 – OPEN FOR SUBMISSIONS UNTIL 05/31/17

Cool project, submit something if you can!

WRITTEN BACKWARDS

Updated (01/23/17):

Lucy A. Snyder has been chosen to co-edit Chiral Mad 4!

More than twenty requests were received over the last few days to co-edit the anthology (from writers and editors around the world), and after careful consideration, series creator/editor Michael Bailey has chosen to work with Lucy to bring you something entirely new with Chiral Mad 4, an entirely-collaborative anthology.

While previous volumes of Chiral Mad focused more on psychological horror, with most stories having some sort of chiral aspect in plot or character development or structure, Chiral Mad 4 will be open to just about anything, as long as the story has some sort of dark or speculative element. The only required chirality is with the collaboration itself … multiple minds working as one, in other words, to create something entirely new. We want this anthology to be as diverse as humanly possible, and will be looking for stories that bend and…

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Monthly short fiction roundup – February 2017

Great recap of February stories. Always happy to see a Gamut story on this list. Stephen’s story is chilling, for sure.

Maria Haskins

I read a lot in February, it seems, but as usual I feel like I didn’t read enough: there are so many great stories out there, just waiting to be devoured. I’ve come to the conclusion, that if I could ever clone myself, I’d make one clone just for reading.

Anyway. Here are fifteen fantastic stories I read in February.

HEL 266, by Sara Rich in See The Elephant. “A thousand gigantic serpents slithered through the tops of the trees, catching her eye. Rustle. Shuffle. Hiss.” I love stories that start out solidly realistic, only to slowly but surely twist themselves into deep, dark horror, and that is exactly what Hel 266 does. It starts off as a scientific expedition to gather core samples from ancient trees, only to end up with visions of hallucinatory, existential, even biblical, terror. Vivid and terrifying, this story has haunted me ever…

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Why I Quit My Job: Project †3Dark

Keep an eye out for this. Stoked, for sure.

Joseph Sale: Graphic-Horror Writer

Yesterday, at roughly 9:30am, I quit my job.

It was a good job, in many respects. It paid decent wages. There was a great team of people there who I shared laughs with. I enjoyed my time there. But, unfortunately, I had come to a realisation, a reality I had to face, which was that I was being called by my true vocation: writing. That’s the thing. Something we must all bear in mind: there’s a difference between a career, a job and a vocation, a ‘calling’ we feel deep down, that drives us, that makes us who we are. It’s folly to ignore that calling.

16832106_10212473454656554_4274511359376022137_n This is me. I’m completely normal. Completely. Don’t worry about those things I wrote. Shhhh.

For a long time, I’d convinced myself I could go on doing the 40 hours a week and write here and there in between, but now I’ve realised it’s just…

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I’m Teaching a New 16-Week Advanced Creative Writing Workshop Class Online!

2016bestofcovers

WE ARE NOW SIGNING UP FOR THE JANUARY 2018 CLASS.
BOOKS WILL CHANGE in 2018, FYI.
(May and September 2017 are full.)  

Since my last class, Contemporary Dark Fiction, has done so well, I thought I’d launch a second class, an Advanced Creative Writing Workshop. How is this class different? Well, there will be less focus on craft, and teaching you the basics, and more time spent reading and writing. It’s essentially what I did when I got my MFA back in 2012.

What I loved in my MFA was reading contemporary short fiction to see what was going on, what was being published, and what was getting attention. I can’t think of a better way to do that than to read these three anthologies: The Best American Short Stories, The Best Horror of the Year, and The Best American Science Fiction and Fantasy. This is a great way to stay up to date, to research current markets, study with the masters, and find new voices. In my MFA we only focused on literary fiction (BASS), so adding in Best Horror and Best SF&F will really help you to expand your voice and learn from those genres as well. (If we publish a Best of Gamut in 2018, we may swap that out, down the road, for one of these titles.)

With class sizes small, a maximum of eight students, these will probably fill up quickly.

More information below.

OVERVIEW:

Each week, you will read two stories that I have curated from the three aforementioned anthologies, selecting the stories that I think are the most powerful, unique, and with the most to teach us. There will also be a weekly Skype call (2 hours), where we will talk about that week’s short stories, and what the authors did well, how they are innovative, and how you might apply that to your own writing. We will also workshop two of YOUR stories, applying the same level of critical analysis. (Two student stories per week, with each student workshopping a total of FOUR stories, overall.) We will have additional ongoing questions and conversations on Facebook (in a private, secret group). At the end of the month, you will turn in an original short story based on whatever inspired you over the course of our studies, up to 5,000 words. I will read, edit, and critique each story, and return it to you with advice on what to do next (keep editing, drop it, polish it up, send it out). In addition to commenting on each other’s work (workshopping) the stories in Skype, you will also read and give feedback on the other short stories in the class via email (and the Word docs). At the end of the semester you will get one hour of private Skype time with me to talk about anything you like—your work in class, other projects, the industry in general, markets, query letters, how to get an agent, what to do next, etc. (Note: You will have to come to class with ONE short story already written. You will write THREE in class, not turning in a story in the final month.)

WHO IS THIS CLASS FOR:

  1. Advanced students who are looking to take their writing to the next level
  2. Authors who write genre fiction and are looking to make their work more literary
  3. Literary authors who are looking to add some genre, or supernatural aspects, to their realism
  4. Authors who have published several stories already
  5. Authors who don’t need to be taught craft, or the basics of short story writing
  6. Anyone looking to expand their understanding of contemporary fiction
  7. Authors that are looking to publish in the top magazines, websites, and anthologies
  8. Writers who have the time and discipline to read every week, and write a new short story once a month

(This is not a class for beginning students or authors, unless you already have some study and experience. We will not teach the basics, but will already assume you understand that, and are looking to study contemporary masters, apply it to your own work, and then create new material on a monthly basis.)

COST/FINANCING:

$800, via Paypal to wickerkat@aol.com. $100 non-refundable deposit is required to hold your spot. If you are a returning student (from ANY of my classes, anywhere) take 10% off. If you pay in FULL at the time of deposit, take an additional 10% off. Otherwise, it’s $100 upon registration, $350 before class starts, and the balance of $350 due prior to the start of the second month. You are required to purchase the three anthologies (or feel free to check them out at your local library) for extended discussion. (Additional payment options are available, if needed.)

Returning student + paid in full: $640 ($40 a week)
Returning student, not paid in full: $720 ($100 down + $310/$310; $45 a week)
Paid in full, not returning student: $720 ($45 a week)
Not returning student, not paid in full: $800 ($100 down + $350/$350; $50 a week)

Drop me a note at richardgamut@gmail.com to register, to request a full syllabus, or if you have any questions.

Thanks,
Richard